North Seymour Island

North Seymour is a small island near to Baltra Island in the Galapagos Islands. It was formed by uplift of a submarine lava formation. The whole island is covered with low, bushy vegetation.

The island is named after an English nobleman, Lord Hugh Seymour. It has an area of 1.9 0.73 sq mi and a maximum altitude of 92 ft. This island is home to a large population of blue-footed boobies and swallow-tailed gulls. It hosts one of the largest populations of frigatebirds.
One of the most famous birds found in the Galapagos are the Blue-footed Booby that are found on North Seymour.


North Seymour was created by seismic uplift, rather than being of volcanic origin. The island has a flat profile with cliffs only a few meters from the shoreline, where swallowtail gulls and tropicbirds sit perched in ledges. A tiny forest of silver-grey Palo Santo trees stand just above the landing, usually without leaves, waiting for rain to bring them into bloom. The island is teeming with life.

North Seymour is an extraordinary place for breeding birds, and is home to one of the largest populations of nesting blue-footed boobies and magnificent frigate birds. Magnificent Frigatebirds perch in low bushes, near the boobies, while watching over their large chicks. The frigates are huge, dark aerobats with a 90-inch wingspan. Male frigates can puff up their scarlet throat sacks to resemble giant red balloons.

Source: Wikipedia
Photo Credit: Mikael

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